The Boomtown rats: I don’t like Mondays

Tags: classroom dynamics, critical thinking, memes, reading
Level: Intermediate, Upper-intermediate

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For this activity it is best if you have mobile devices with access to internet in the classroom or a computer room. 1 per 3 to 5 students is best.

STEP 1

Start by asking students which days of the week are good /bad for them and why. If the group is a big one you might want to split them up into smaller groups beforehand so they first share within their groups.

This will probably generate the stereotypical Monday hates. Ask them what they do to avoid the bad feelings on Monday. If you have groups and access to internet, they can write ideas and suggestions in a Googledoc. (for more info on how to set up a Gdoc, see here)

 

STEP 2 (optional)

Ask students to find or create memes connected to Mondays and share them online in a Gdoc.

a good site for this is

http://memegenerator.net/create/instance

Have them listen to the song while they are working on it followed by this song.

 

STEP 3

Ask students to find out what the connection is between these two songs.  Don’t give them too much help with titles, artists etc. This is a good exercise in reading and evaluating online sources and it is a good idea to talk about these after they finish.

 

STEP 4

Groups report on what they found out either online or during the class.  But even more important than the report on the outcome is perhaps the report on how they came to the results.

Have a discussion on how they dealt with the task and why, talk about group dynamics and roles they took during the task. Share your observations with them (it is a good idea to write these down) especially things that were outside of the expected frame.

 

(The second part of this task was inspired by the huge response after Sugata Mitra’s plenary in Harrogate 2014. I wanted to test my students’ behaviour when faced with a “hole in the wall” and came to really interesting fndings + we had a fantastic debate after the task in which we talked about the role of the teacher and what they expect from teachers in general.)

 

 

 

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